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Secrets to a Glowing Winter Skin

PostedJuly 4, 2018

Soaking

Winter is in full swing and yep, let’s face it: The livin’ ain’t easy for your skin. After all, you have the rough elbows, red nose, chapped lips and static hair to prove it, right?

Did you know that your skin loses up to 25% of its ability to hold moisture as the mercury drops? It’s official, winter is pretty much the worst season to look amazing!

As the temperature drops and the cold weather and dry air seem to suck out every ounce of moisture we so desperately try to lock in, we are all in search of easy ways to get that summer glow in winter.

Celebrities share their unconventional winter beauty secrets on social media, and yes, we are in awe! Halle Berry mixes coffee with her body wash and slathers the concoction on her body in the shower. Apparently, this DIY exfoliator is said to promote blood flow and soften the skin due to the natural stimulating caffeine! In an interview with Vogue Italy, the beautiful Julia Roberts revealed that she soaks her nails and hair in a mask of emulsified olive oil (essentially just combining olive oil and water) for a healthy sheen.

So, are you ready to Glow for it? Here’s the drill:

Fatten up. Sadly, we’re not talking lasagne and red-velvet cupcakes! Great skin is very much an inside-out job. Adding more good fats to your daily diet will plump up a depleted complexion within a few days. Foods rich in Omega-3 and Omega-6 will help your skin to produce more lipids which will retain and balance moisture levels.

Up your H2O intake to keep your skin hydrated. Cut the coffee and the booze, both are super dehydrating.

Ditch the soap. Fragrant, soapy gels may feel (and smell) wonderful but they will leave your skin dry in winter. Switch to a soap-free, hydrating cleanser. Washing your hands regularly is key to keeping germs at bay, but it wreaks havoc on your skin’s moisture levels. Replace some of those washes with a hand sanitiser. They do contain alcohol that will dry out the skin, but often not to the extreme that soap and water can.

Limit your showers to 5 minutes using only luke-warm water. Hot water removes the skin’s natural oils quicker.

Soak smart. Add a few drops of almond oil, wheat germ, or grapeseed oil to bathwater to lock in hydration.

Shampoo and condition first. Suds from your shampoo inevitably run over your face and body, depositing a film caused by the strong cleansers found in many hair products.

Moisturise while your skin is still damp. Also, switch from a lotion to a cream. Creams provide a stronger oily barrier, which means reduced water loss from the outer layers of the skin as well as hydrating the skin at the same time. Don’t forget the sunscreen, winter sun can be just as damaging.

A gentle body scrub and facial exfoliant once a week can help to remove dead cells. Try a mixture of honey and sugar to soften rough patches on hands and knees.

Use DIY masks. Use ingredients like honey, avocado, yogurt, olive and jojoba oils, bananas, or almond oil. Mix what you like into a paste and leave on the skin for 10 minutes for lasting hydration.

Hook up the humidifier. Try this at work to bring moisture levels back to normal.

Try a few of these tips to keep your skin healthy and glowy, no matter what old man winter throws your way!

Source: www.timeslive.co.za, stylecaster.com, www.ndtv.com, www.instyle.com, drinkoriginal.com, www.cosmopolitan.com, www.advanceddentalspa.com.au, www.femina.in, www.maryvancenc.com, www.bewell.com, www.sheknows.com, www.health.com, awomanshealth.com, www.womanshealthmag.com, www.wikihow.com, www.drfrankklipman.com, www.webmd.com, allwomanstalk.com, www.womanshealthonline.com, www.huffingtonpost.com, www.rooirose.co.za

 

DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is for educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. If you are experiencing symptoms or need health advice, please consult a healthcare professional.