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How to Change Bad Eating Habits

PostedMay 4, 2016

Healthy Living, Eating Clean

WOAH … Everyone and their cousin Fred is talking about health and wellness and the advice is flying! Ok, so you’re looking to eat healthy, lose weight, or looking to get fit – or all of the above! Where to start?

Most of us are creatures of habit; we buy the same foods from the same grocery stores, prepare the same recipes, over and over, and live within our own familiar routines. True … old habits die hard! But, if you’re serious about healthier living, you need to shake it up.

French fries, cookies, cheeseburgers … there’s a reason why we love food that’s bad for us: It tastes so good! But, according to a study from Tufts University it may be possible to train your brain to stop craving unhealthy food! Yes, it’s all about breaking those bad habits.

And yes, of course there’s a bit of willpower involved. You don’t just eat ice cream every day and then magically crave Greek yogurt instead!  According to the experts you should start “swapping up”. If you’re a buttery cracker kind of person, try whole-wheat crackers. White pasta lover? … Opt for wholegrain instead. Eventually tastes change and you’ll end up preferring the healthy option.

Breaking sugar cravings can be hard. Grab a handful of strawberries, or if you need to start slow, dip them in antioxidant-rich dark chocolate. Also, Mareya Ibrahim, author of The Clean Eating Handbook, suggests that you up your protein intake to curb sugar cravings. Protein will help to keep you feeling fuller for longer.

Ok, so if you still can’t go without junk food on a Friday night, pair it with a healthy salad. It’s never a good idea to go cold turkey. Eat the healthy part first to fill you up a little more so that you eat less of the unhealthy foods. Change your mind set to change your lifestyle. Clever! Isn’t the human brain incredible!

Life is beautiful and you don’t want to bog yourself down with unnecessary health problems. Did you know that it takes only 21 days to form a new habit?

Here are a few healthy tweaks to get you started:

  • Celebrate humble H2O. This micro-action is brilliantly easy. Hydration makes us thrive in all sorts of ways and is integral to pretty much every function of our bodies. Simply top up your water intake.
  • Make one healthy swap. Instead of giving something up, swap it for a more nutritious option; swap soda for water, coffee for tea, or a chocolate bar for a piece of fruit.
  • Fend off snack attacks. Keep a stash of good stuff for when you get peckish. 30g of nuts will hit the spot!
  • Have a healthy breakfast. Pimp your porridge with cinnamon, whizz up a delicious smoothie, or crack out the eggs.
  • Prepare your own meals, avoid processed foods.
  • Sit at the table and be mindful of what you put in your mouth. You’re much more likely to overeat if your mind is elsewhere.
  • Reduce your portion size by 20%’ and give up second helpings.
  • Try grilling, roasting or poaching, instead of frying food.
  • Get a workout buddy to make you feel accountable.
  • Breathe deeply. Most of us take only shallow breaths and breathe to a third of our lung capacity. Oxygen is a vital source of life.
  • Limit alcohol to one drink per day.
  • Quit the smoking habit.
  • Get enough sleep, fatigue can lead to overeating.
  • Hang out with healthy people. Eat and exercise with people who are health conscious, it makes healthy living more fun.
  • Live a life of purpose.

Substituting unhealthy habits with healthy ones rewards you with more stamina, better quality of life – and a healthier you.

So, come on, stock your pantry with healthy options and start living a healthier life today!

Source: www.heart.org, now.tufts.edu, beautyredefined.net, brookenotonadiet.com, you-app.com/7-healthy-eating-habits-that-can-change-your-life-jamie-o, personalexcellence.co, zenhabits.net, www.webmd.com, dailymakeover.com

DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is for educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. If you are experiencing symptoms or need health advice, please consult a healthcare professional.